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Nollywood movies i need a man

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In December he captivated an audience at a conference in Texas, United States, as he narrated the story of his success after failures in some other business ventures. The Nigerian film industry is undoubtedly helping create jobs in a country with an economy that relies mainly on oil and agriculture. Believing that if the industry is properly managed, a million more jobs could be created in the sector, the World Bank is currently assisting the Nigerian government to create a Growth and Employment in States project to support the entertainment industry, along with other industries. Film industry analysts believe that the Nigerian cinema is the most popular on the continent. Nollywood films have a large following in Africa and among Africans around the world. They gained popularity during the digital revolution of the early s when camcorders replaced millimeter film cameras, and digital systems replaced celluloid as recording devices.

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I t is late afternoon, and the crew and cast of a film called American Dream are on location in an office block in suburban Lagos. An office here, borrowed for the day, is doubling as a flashy advertising agency, and on set the male lead is busy ironing his pink shirt on a desk, while the producer is shouting for the props man.

The crew was meant to have wrapped these scenes up by midday and the director, Tony Abulu, is anxious. In a country where movies are made on shoestring budgets and cracked out in an average of 10 days, slips in the schedule can be disastrous.

In response to the producer's hollering, a man in flip-flops staggers into the room beneath a giant plant pot. Another member of the crew brings in a flat-screen computer. The scene is set and the cameras can roll. Nigeria is home to one of the world's youngest film industries, but it's booming. The films are made on the cheap, but they are big box office. Except that there is no box office, of course.

In Nollywood, as it has inevitably been dubbed, movies are shot on video and copied straight on to tapes or DVDs and then sold on from thousands of street stalls and hole-in-the-wall shops, not just in Nigeria but across the continent, as well to the African diaspora via markets in the west.

We have decided to take on the world. There are signs that the world is taking an interest - the Hollywood actor Wesley Snipes came to check out investment opportunities last September. You might argue that Nollywood needs to do something about its hackneyed plots, hammy acting and appalling sound quality if it's to become a real rival to Hollywood. But for African audiences, Nollywood films have one unique selling point. If Hollywood's forte is jaw-dropping spectacle and Bollywood's is heart-warming musical slush, then Nollywood's special draw is a genre that might be described as the voodoo horror flick: films that revolve around witchcraft and demonic possession.

Most observers agree that it all began in , with Living in Bondage, a cautionary tale about a man who gets sucked into a cult that demands the sacrifice of his wife in exchange for riches. The title refers to spiritual rather than sexual bondage.

Since then, the genre has gone from strength to strength. The movies can be read as fantasies; they allow the powerless to feel vicariously powerful. The stories tell of poor men getting rich, of errant husbands who find their penises shrinking, of love rivals who go blind or crazy and end up running naked and shrieking into the streets.

There is the occasional humorous twist. One classic features a controlling girlfriend who miniaturises her man and traps him inside a bottle. But the films always end with the practitioners of witchcraft being punished although sometimes they are redeemed by finding Jesus and the virtuous being rewarded. One of the reasons this is such a powerful draw is that in Nigeria, as elsewhere in Africa, Christianity lies like a veneer over much older beliefs. The occult movies give people a chance to thrill once again to the power of the old religion, but then celebrate the victory of the new faith as the credits roll.

We made people sit down and think, and opened up their minds. After that film came out, a lot of people left these [witchcraft] cults.

The power of the genre is evident during a visit to one of Nigeria's improvised backstreet cinemas. The cinema is essentially a grimy concrete shelter with a billygoat tied up by the door. Inside, a dozen or so men and women are watching a Nollywood video on a small TV. The crowd sway and click their fingers during musical interludes, and giggle and shove each other during comic passages.

But they watch enthralled when a woman in the grip of an occult mania is exorcised by a man in a giant blue turban and flowing robe. Back on the set of American Dream, the make-up artist, Benjamin Ejimnkeonye, finishes powdering the noses of two mountainous henchmen and passes around photos from voodoo thrillers he has worked on.

One of the pictures shows women made up as witches, their hair wild, white clay smeared on their faces and circles of red lipstick around their lips and eyes.

That's when I like my job. Not all Nollywood movies are about the occult, of course. Nigeria is a country of startling inequality; in Lagos, skinny fishermen in pirogues skim past the skyscrapers of Victoria Island, the palm-studded local equivalent of Manhattan, and slums sprawl under flyovers. But as is true of Bollywood, Nollywood likes to eschew the grit of everyday life for a more upbeat vision. As well as occult movies, and gangster movies, another popular genre involves straightforwardly aspirational tales.

American Dream is typical. In the movies, characters are always dashing from the gym to the boardroom in chauffeur-driven cars, or ordering champagne in chic restaurants. On the shoot, there are more delays. The cast and crew are waiting for one of the lead actors who is hours late.

As some of the actors swig Guinness in the sweltering heat, I talk to Segun Arinze, a portly veteran actor who has a key role in the scene to be shot today. A short while later, however, with impeccable professionalism, Arinze is cheerfully swaggering through an entirely different role - as an underworld loan shark.

With this last-minute switch, there has been no time to learn his lines, and barely minutes to get into character. Most of his dialogue is improvised. Such fluidity is commonplace. With little time to rehearse, the actors frequently read from scripts left open on the floor during filming and most of the emphasis is placed on moving the plot forwards. Nollywood directors are sanguine about long passages of improvisation, and the dialogue that results is a clunky and sometimes bizarre mix of western movie cliches and Nigerian references.

Take, for example, the following fragment of dialogue from a film about a chieftain's son who is forbidden by his family to marry his girlfriend:. She: You want to pay me in exchange for the love I have for you? Oh God, how did I get myself into this mess? Have you forgotten our promises and dreams?

Nigeria has perhaps the most distinguished literary tradition in Africa; Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Ben Okri and Ken Saro-Wiwa are the best-known writers, but it is clear that Nigeria's home video industry has no pretensions to high art. What it's all about is money. Nollywood movies were originally financed by importers of blank video tapes as a way of promoting sales of their product - and commerce remains king.

About 30 new titles arrive weekly at Lagos's giant open-air markets, where canvas banners with gaudy portraits of movie stars flap above the mediaeval hubbub. For the most part, Nigerians are proud of their movie industry and other African nations are envious.

We have more than languages, different cultures, all unique in themselves. Nigeria is an African giant - it is the continent's most populous nation, with million people. But it's also a country that appears to be constantly on the verge of a breakdown. It is a British colonial creation, knitting together a Christian south and Muslim north, scores of ethnic groups and struggling to deal with festering discontent in the oil-rich delta region. That makes the film censor's job a tricky one. Lagos, the commercial capital, is a microcosm of Nigeria's volatile mix.

It is a monster: already home to 15 million and growing so fast that by the UN estimates it will be home to as many as 24 million, making it the third biggest city in the world.

There is a sense of natural theatre on the streets of the city; even asking for directions leads to raised voices and urgent hand signals. A popular romantic lead, he is sometimes described as "the Denzel of Nollywood". Here, the ability of an actor to portray emotion with tears is a plus. If you can't cry at the drop of a hat you're seen as a bad actor. On the American Dream shoot, filming has transferred to a poor quarter of Lagos, where the streets are lined with stained concrete houses with tin roofs, and chickens peck at rubbish heaps.

A crowd gathers as the female lead, played by Maryam Basir, an African-American actor and model, teeters across a narrow wooden footbridge wearing a zebra-print summer dress and stacked heels. The male lead, Nigerian actor Karibi Fubara, is being filmed making a long-distance call to his girlfriend at a public booth, a wooden table where a handset offers a crackly connection. When his allotted time runs out he tries to hang on to the phone, squeezing in a few extra seconds and ignoring the impatient queue behind.

This is the cue for a female extra in a luminous green dress to seize the handset and berate him with a string of Hausa swearwords. The woman's tirade mingles with the hoots of a watching crowd of small boys and the growl of passing motorbike taxis. Almost miraculously, the production seems to be somehow coming together.

Wait until we're an adult, and then those who criticise us will come back and learn from us. Take, for example, the following fragment of dialogue from a film about a chieftain's son who is forbidden by his family to marry his girlfriend: He: My love for you cannot break, but the people and gods of my land want me to break it. She [in floods of tears]: They want you to send me away. He: Angel, don't cry. Let's try to find a solution to this problem. Topics Film.

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Making a fortune by distributing Nigerian films online

I t is late afternoon, and the crew and cast of a film called American Dream are on location in an office block in suburban Lagos. An office here, borrowed for the day, is doubling as a flashy advertising agency, and on set the male lead is busy ironing his pink shirt on a desk, while the producer is shouting for the props man. The crew was meant to have wrapped these scenes up by midday and the director, Tony Abulu, is anxious. In a country where movies are made on shoestring budgets and cracked out in an average of 10 days, slips in the schedule can be disastrous. In response to the producer's hollering, a man in flip-flops staggers into the room beneath a giant plant pot.

In early , the top three social apps in use by teenagers were YouTube, Instagram, and Snapchat. Apps that you would find on virtually every Nigerian smartphone.

Watch Now. Jand Hustle Watch Now. Jimi Bendel Watch Now. Mama Africa Watch Now.

Most popular apps in nigeria

Why would a Hollywood film become a Nigerian video remake, a Tanzanian comic book, or a Congolese music video? Matthias Krings explores the myriad ways Africans respond to the relentless onslaught of global culture. He seeks out places where they have adapted pervasive cultural forms to their own purposes as photo novels, comic books, songs, posters, and even scam letters. These African appropriations reveal the broad scope of cultural mediation that is characteristic of our hyperlinked age. Krings argues that there is no longer an "original" or "faithful copy," but only endless transformations that thrive in the fertile ground of African popular culture. This is undoubtedly a very well researched Book. Regrettably,I was only able to read the brief excerpts and would really want to buy a copy of the Book. Is the Book available in Nairobi,Kenya? The Part on the Drum publications of yesteryears Boom,Sadness and Joy,African Film,and The Stranger was quite interesting as I could relate with it very well having grown up with the publications in the early seventies.

Nigeria’s film industry: a potential gold mine?

A mediocre travel book. Saro-Wiwa is too often unwilling to engage with other people along the way. For example, when visiting the underwhelming, powerless National Museum in Lagos, she is annoyed Leer comentario completo. Noo Saro-Wiwa is the daughter of human rights activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, who was murdered by the Nigerian government as part of their efforts to keep Shell Oil Company happy.

Emeka Ike was one of the most popular Nigerian Nollywood actors famous for his roles as the classic lover boy in Nollywood movies.

Is there anyone out there that still believe that some things are not possible within the laws of God and man? This book will once and for all put your doubts to death. How to unravel the mystery to the extraordinary life is no longer a secret.

Welcome to Nollywood

The following are the highest-grossing Nigerian films of all time in Nigerian cinemas. Revenues from special screenings, DVD sales, online streaming and theatrical screenings outside Nigeria are excluded from this gross total. Films before s are also excluded from this list as their gross totals have not been inflation adjusted. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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An authoritative guide to African cinema with contributions from a team of experts on the topic. A Companion to African Cinema offers an overview of critical approaches to African cinema. With contributions from an international panel of experts, the Companion approaches the topic through the lens of cultural studies, contemporary transformations in the world order, the rise of globalization, film production, distribution, and exhibition. This volume represents a new approach to African cinema criticism that once stressed the sociological and sociopolitical aspects of a film. The text explores a wide range of broad topics including: cinematic economics, video movies, life in cinematic urban Africa, reframing human rights, as well as more targeted topics such as the linguistic domestication of Indian films in the Hausa language and the importance of female African filmmakers and their successes in overcoming limitations caused by gender inequality.

Man buried inside new BMW? No, photo from Nigerian movie

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Mar 22, - Nigeria now has the world's third largest film industry after Hollywood and Bollywood. In response to the producer's hollering, a man in flip-flops staggers You might argue that Nollywood needs to do something about its.

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Most Popular Nollywood Movies and TV Shows

Kingsley is fresh out of university, eager to find an engineering job so he can support his family and marry the girl of his dreams. Being the opara of the family, he is entitled to certain privileges - a piece of meat in his egusi soup, a party to celebrate his graduation. But times are hard in Nigeria and jobs are not easy to come by.

List of highest-grossing Nigerian films

Muna's driving desire to provide a better life for herself and grandmother in Votes: Adventure, Comedy, Romance.

Святилище и алтарь расположены над центром и смотрят вниз, на главный алтарь. Деревянные скамьи заполняют вертикальную ось, растянувшись на сто с лишним метров, отделяющих алтарь от основания креста.

К тому времени когда компьютер разгадает пароль и взломает шифр, информация, содержащаяся в послании, утратит всякую ценность. Оказавшись в условиях подлинного разведывательного затемнения, АНБ выпустило секретную директиву, одобренную президентом Соединенных Штатов. Заручившись поддержкой федеральных фондов и получив карт-бланш на все необходимые меры для решения проблемы, АНБ приступило к созданию невозможного - первой универсальной машины для вскрытия шифров.

Вопреки широко распространенному мнению о том, что такой компьютер создать невозможно, АНБ осталось верным своему девизу: возможно все; на невозможное просто требуется больше времени. Через пять лет, истратив полмиллиона рабочих часов и почти два миллиарда долларов, АН Б вновь доказало жизненность своего девиза.

Коммандер Стратмор обошел систему Сквозь строй. Фонтейн подошел к ней, едва сдерживая гнев. - Это его прерогатива. Я плачу вам за то, чтобы вы следили за отчетностью и обслуживали сотрудников, а не шпионили за моим заместителем. Если бы не он, мы бы до сих пор взламывали шифры с помощью карандаша и бумаги.

А теперь уходите! - Он повернулся к Бринкерхоффу, с побледневшим лицом стоявшему возле двери.

Действуй своим маячком очень осторожно, - сказал Стратмор.  - Если Северная Дакота заподозрит, что мы его ищем, он начнет паниковать и исчезнет вместе с паролем, так что никакая штурмовая группа до него не доберется.

- Все произойдет, как булавочный укол, - заверила его Сьюзан.

Comments: 1
  1. Vudoran

    Many thanks for an explanation, now I will know.

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